Webinar: How to Practice Patent Law After Alice

A recording of this webinar is available online.

The PowerPoint presentation for this webinar is posted here: How to Practice Patent Law After Alice

John Kong’s paper is posted here:  Surviving Alice Gone Wild 12-09-2014

Presented by the IP Legal Network, this free webinar on December 9, 2014, at 1 pm EST, will provide practical advice for navigating the tumult that has followed the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank.  Many people are talking about how to respond to Section 101 challenges and draft applications to make patent claims survive Section 101 scrutiny – and we will, too.  However, if the post-Alice world has made anything clear, it is that some subject matter that previously would have been found patent-eligible is now very unlikely to be issued by the USPTO – and even if claims issue, surviving the scrutiny of a federal court or the Patent Trial and Appeals Board presents a challenge.  So what are intellectual property owners to do?

Topics will include:

Section 101 and Patent Prosecution:

  • How to counsel patent applicants and potential applicants on what is patent-eligible (and what is not)
  • Different approaches taken by the examining corps and the PTAB
  • Strategies for responding to Section 101 rejections
  • Drafting tips for new specifications and claims to improve patent-eligibility arguments

Section 101 and Issued Patents:

  • Options for patent owners
    • Reissues, re-exams, and dependent claims
  • Options for defendants
    • Procedural considerations: Rule 12, Rule 56, and/or the PTAB?
    • What are the tests a district court will apply?

Click HERE to register.

Presenters: Charles Bieneman (Bejin Bieneman PLC), Rick Holzer (Holzer IP Law, PC), and John Kong (Westerman, Hattori, Daniels and Adrian, LLP).

Upcoming Webinar

Functional Claiming After Williamson v. Citrix
December 14, 2017 at 12:00 pm CST
During the webinar, Charles Bieneman will cover strategies for avoiding – or embracing – functional claim interpretations, and for avoiding findings that functional claim language is indefinite. Register

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