Covenants Not to Sue Trigger Patent Exhaustion

The interaction of the patent exhaustion doctrine and covenants not to sue was highlighted in a recent opinion from the District of Delaware in Purdue v. Collegium. The court denied Collegium’s motion to dismiss, which was premi… Read More

Reasonable Patent Royalties Require Proper Apportionment

Damages for patent infringement must be apportioned to the infringing features of an accused product and supported by substantial evidence. Finjan, Inc., v. Blue Coat Systems Inc., No. 2016-2520 (January 10, 2018) (precedential).… Read More

With License Ambiguous, Patent Exhaustion Heads to Jury

In Audio MPEG, Inc. v. Dell Inc., the Eastern District of Virginia denied summary judgment of patent exhaustion because it was ambiguous whether a license between Audio MPEG and Dell’s supplier Microsoft covered the allegedly in… Read More

The Plain Meaning of a Covenant Not to Sue

How can you draft a covenant not to sue for patent infringement without agreeing to restrictions that will prevent you from enforcing your patent rights against some unknown party in the future? In Securus Technologies Inc. v. Glo… Read More

When Are Patent Claims Standard-Essential?

The question of whether claims from 23 different patents were “essential” to the IEEE 802.11 standard (popularly known as Wi-Fi) was presented to the court in In re Innovatio Ip Ventures, MDL Docket No. 2303, Case No. 11 C 930… Read More